Occupational Therapy

Occupational therapists are trained to assist people of all ages to perform the functional tasks that normally occupy their lives. The “occupations” of childhood are play, activities of daily living (feeding, toileting, dressing, grooming, mobility), learning and school performance; learning skills in order to become functional and independent adults.

Education and strategies to modify or compensate to improve function and abilities are taught to achieve the individuals highest level of independence and overall quality of life.

These skills include:

• Regulation of arousal level in order to attend
• Refinement of sensory processing and discrimination
• Continual refinement and development of motor skills(gross & fine)
• Development of communication skills
• Appropriate engagement/affect and social interactions
• Language and cognitive skills
• Age appropriate self care skills
• Developing a positive self concept

Some examples:

  • Girl’s with Turner Syndrome usually walk late and have poor coordination. OT can address motor skills and coordination through gross motor activities, sensory activities and play to increase balance, coordination, motor planning, strengthening and endurance.
  • Girl’s with Turner Syndrome often have trouble with executive processing, planning and flexibility.  OT can help the client develop and utilize the skills to be able to accept change and increase flexibility and help the client to express concerns and frustrations in an appropriate manner.
  • Girls with Turner Syndrome require more structure to socialize and to complete tasks, and experience increased difficulty in understanding and interpreting social cues. OT can focus on building and understanding social skills by modeling age appropriate interactions, providing lessons, and forming instructional social groups.

©2017 Turner Syndrome Foundation

Turner Syndrome Foundation

Turner Syndrome Foundation

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