We Are Over-Comers | Turner Syndrome Foundation

We Are Over-Comers

Woman with Turner Syndrome and her husband

There will be obstacles that we may have to face in reaching our dreams and potential that others don’t, but we were born over-comers

Written by Angela, TS woman and TSF volunteer, who shares about overcoming challenges

My Diagnosis

After noticing that I was not growing as I should, my parents took me to the doctor several times. Finally, when I was around 9 or 10 years old, they took me to see a genetic doctor and a karyotype was ordered. It showed I had Turner Syndrome. I remember my mother telling me the results of the karyotype. It was just the two of us together in her car. She was a doctor herself, a cardiologist, but she lovingly explained it in a way that I could understand it. She said my X chromosome had “missed the bus”.

Turner Syndrome Challenges

What has impacted me the most with having Turners is the cognitive effects…Until a few years ago, I thought it was just a problem within my own personality. Many of these problems are related more to my Turner Syndrome.

What has impacted me the most with having Turners is the cognitive effects such as processing speed, executive function, motor skills and coordination. I have not been able to drive or ride a bike. I also have some difficulty focusing and multitasking. These slow processing and executive function difficulties have affected me all my life. Until a few years ago, I thought it was just a problem within my own personality. Then, as I started to read more, I found out that the answer was a lot more complex than that. Many of these problems are related more to my Turner Syndrome.

Overcoming Challenges

I encourage other girls and women with TS to focus on their strengths and find what you are passionate about and pursue it.

These cognitive and executive function deficits became more apparent as I grew older. However, they did not prevent me from completing my studies and graduating high school and later, college. I earned a degree in International Studies and History with a French minor. As an adult I worked in a call center environment for many years. I had to overcome some difficulties in my professional life because of my cognitive and processing deficits. Especially between mid 2015 and late 2016, a period during which I was in between jobs. Overall though, I have been blessed to have understanding people in management at the companies I’ve worked for that were able to provide accommodations. Even at the worst of my difficulties back in 2015 and 2016, I did not give up, and worked with an employment agency specializing in helping people with disabilities find suitable work.

In November 2016, I got my current job working from home as a Spanish to English and English to Spanish interpreter. I get to interpret for all sorts of clients including doctors, nurses, judges, and law enforcement officials. While I still have to work around my difficulties, perhaps asking for repetition and clarifications, clients overall are very patient with it and I’m doing well. My current job duties allow me to focus more on my verbal/ language strengths. There is not as much multitasking involved as in my previous job. I encourage other girls and women with TS to focus on their strengths and find what you are passionate about and pursue it. There will be obstacles that we may have to face in reaching our dreams and potential that others don’t, but we were born over-comers. Don’t hesitate to use resources within your school place of employment and community for assistance.

My Story is not Limited

Additionally, like most other TS women, I also face infertility, but I’ve learned to come to terms with it. I understand that my worth as a person and as a woman is not defined by my ability to bear children biologically. It is my hope for my TS sisters to understand this. I hope they know that that when they are ready to raise a family in another way, we all have as much love and knowledge to offer a child as a woman who can have one biologically would.

I am most proud of completing my high school and college studies, and being a good wife to my husband and keeping our marriage strong, even when the difficulties posed by TS cause frustrations in life. In addition, I am proud of overcoming anxiety and challenges to be better at my job as an interpreter everyday. Without God and my family though, I would not have overcome these things to be where I am today. I strive for a love-filled life with my husband, a closer relationship with God, and my family. I also hope to make more friends both in the TS community and outside of it. God-willing, maybe, we will adopt a child as well.

Connecting with TSF

Through the Foundation, I’ve been able to get access to great resources and information. In addition, I’ve been able to connect with other women with TS that I may not have otherwise met.

I believe I first connected with Turner Syndrome Foundation about 4 years ago. I’ve had the privilege to use my translation skills as a volunteer of the organization. Through the Foundation, I’ve been able to get access to great resources and information. I’ve shared it with others in the TS community and with my doctors. In addition, I’ve been able to connect with other women with TS that I may not have otherwise met. This has made me feel supported and empowered to advocate for myself and for others who have TS during my journey.


Thank you, Angela, for bravely sharing your story. Your message of perseverance and strength to overcome challenges is an inspiration to us all. We also appreciate the time and talent you have given to advance our work in providing resources for the Turner Syndrome community. Women who have Turner Syndrome each face a unique set of challenges, but we believe in each one of you to set your own goals and strive for them.

If you would like to share your story, you can do so by clicking the button below. We love to hear from you about your life, and the support we can provide. Most importantly, we love to celebrate your successes! Everyone has a story to share!

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